The Cybersecurity and Communications Reliability Division (CCR) helps ensure that the nation’s communications networks are reliable and secure so that the public can communicate, especially during emergencies. CCR identifies and promotes network improvements through investigations, stakeholder-driven processes, and rulemakings. Focus areas include emergency communications, such as 911 and emergency alerting, network performance during disasters, and major network outages and threats.

Network Reliability.  CCR monitors and analyzes communications network outages to identify trends, assess actions the FCC can take to help prevent and mitigate outages, and where necessary, assist response and recovery activities.

Network Outage Reporting System (NORS): Communications providers are required file timely network outage information in NORS, and CCR analyses the data to identify trends and determine whether the outages could likely have been prevented or mitigated had the providers followed certain network reliability best practices.

911 Reliability.  Covered 911 service providers, or providers that aggregate 911 traffic from an originating service provider and deliver it to a 911 call center, must annually certify that they take reasonable measures to provide reliable 911 service.

911 Reliability Certification System:  filings are due Annually by providers that (service 911 whatever the stipulation was/is) usually by October 15th.

Network Reliability Resources:  Information on ensuring and improving network reliability, including resources related to emergency alerting, disaster and emergency response, and cybersecurity.

Disaster Preparedness and Response.  During emergencies, CCR collects information on the operational status of communications infrastructure to support government disaster assistance efforts and to monitor restoration and recovery.  CCR also oversees and monitors industry efforts to strengthen wireless network resiliency.

Disaster Information Reporting System (DIRS):  Communications service providers (including wireless, wireline, broadcast, and cable companies) voluntarily report infrastructure status and situational awareness information in DIRS during emergencies for which DIRS is activated.

Wireless Resiliency Cooperative Framework:  The Framework is a voluntary industry commitment to ensure that wireless service works during and after disasters.

Risks and Vulnerabilities.  The Division works to identify and reduce risks to the reliability of the nation’s communications network.

Communications Security Reliability and Interoperability Council (CSRIC):  CSRIC is a federal advisory committee that makes recommendations to the FCC on a range of public safety and homeland security-related communications matters, including: (1) the reliability of communications systems and infrastructure; (2) 911, Enhanced 911 (E911), and Next Generation 911 (NG911); (3) emergency alerting; and (4) national security/emergency preparedness (NS/EP) communications, including law enforcement access to communications.

Supply Chain.  In today’s increasingly connected world, safeguarding the security and integrity of America’s communications infrastructure has never been more important; as such, CCR conducts targeted reviews into companies that may pose a potential national security threat to the integrity of U.S. communications networks or the communications supply chain.

Division Leadership

Avery Roselle
Division Chief
Avery.Roselle@fcc.gov
(202) 418-1462

Jennifer Holtz
Deputy Division Chief
Jennifer.Holtz@fcc.gov
(202) 418-2336

WIlliam Kang
Deputy Division Chief
William.Kang@fcc.gov

 

 

Updated: 
Monday, January 11, 2021